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Metro Issue: Aug 21–Aug 27, 2018

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Music Of Movement – Solving Engineering Problems?

Cupertino Harker School student Avi Agarwal does not claim to be a therapist, nor does he claim to suffer from cynism. But he seems to have discovered the solution through a great deal of engineering problems through a solution many are going to find at least peculiar: music. The smart, ambitious youngster has created the Music of Movement system. This special development is said to manipulate mechanical objects with the help of an external sound source/ electronic instrument that can be plugged into the respective system. The versatility of uses for this device is what makes Avi most proud of.

 

Mechanical Object Movement Via Sounds

The technology seems to enable the manipulation of objects with the help of certain sound frequencies and musical notes. The moving of the objects can be triggered with the aid of external sources of sound, hence enabling changes in the object. This means that the system can be found an infinite number of applications. Avi is both an engineer and a musician and the idea to develop the system came to him while fine tuning his guitar one day. Noticing that the sound frequencies of his guitar were read by the electronic tuner while he was manipulating the guitar, he studied the mater more carefully, so he also grew to discover that the electronic tuner was also converting the sound into electronic signals that were turning light on, as indicators on the notes that were played at the time. Using his engineer thinking, he automatically came up with the idea of finding a way to reverse the tuner and use the new device to gain control over material objects.

 

Converting The Frequencies Of Sounds To Electricity  

Young Avi then used the similar algorithm that his electrical tuner was using to transform the frequencies of sounds into electricity. His following discovery was amazing: he was soon running electricity through the mechanical objects of his choice. This way, he was able to use music to gain control over mechanical objects. The Harker student then decided to create a prototype circuit enabling him to completely manipulate a car that was radio-controlled with the aid of any external source of sound. Young Avi’s moving music was soon controlling the RC car. He was using the strings of his guitar to manipulate the small car, and he further developed the system sp it can also rely on radio frequencies and sound waves to do the same. The manufacturing costs of such a system designed by him should not be bigger than $5, with an endless number of applications.

Avi got a patent for his invention and he is also involved in the research of similar patents. His discovery brought him an honorable mention at the Synopsys Science Fair and a proclamation by the Cupertino City Council. He is now working at a way of helping quadriplegics enjoy more freedom of movement through their wheelchairs and his system and a harmonica. Video games using sound instead of the regular controllers and humanoid robots that respond to sounds are other ideas young Avi has in mind.

Who know how long it will be before we will be able to control our mouse or keyboard with the help of similar systems? In the meanwhile, check out the slots-casinos.org/ site for some good old fashioned casino fun, play for real money and read top casino reviews to make the best choices.

 

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